BSD Magazine (Oct-2010) issue: VPN and BSD

There’s another (free) issue available of the BSD Managzine: VPN and BSD (Oct 2010) (link)

Some of the articles are:

bsd magazine Oct 2010

Commissioning FreeBSD with the Drupal Content Management Framework – Part 1

With nearly 6000 modules and PHP support Drupal offers a sophisticated web development platform as well as a thriving community. Drupal, originally conceived by Dries Buytaert, has a reputation of being an extremely capable DContent Management System (CMS) albeit with a steep learning curve. While many criticisms concerning the complexity of the interface will be addressed in the forthcoming Drupal 7 release (which is currently in the alpha stage), Drupal 6 excels in stability, flexibility and high quality code. The developers also subscribe to a transparent policy towards security issues, and have a dedicated security team which ensures that core modules remain high quality. Used as the basis of many high profile sites.

Building VPNs on OpenBSD

A VPN is a network made up of multiple private networks situated at different locations, linked together using secure tunnels over a public (insecure) network, typically the Internet. VPNs are becoming increasingly popular, as they allow companies to join the LANs of their branches or subsidiaries into a single private network (site-to-site VPNs) or to provide mobile employees, such as sales people, access to their corporate network from outside the premises (remote-access VPNs), thus making accessing and sharing internal information much easier.

Closed-source and unsupported drivers with FreeBSD

Sooner or later you come to a conclusion that you need to have an enhanced mobility throughout your home place. And you decide to purchase an Wi-Fi card and put it into a home gate-keeper. Do you know about troubles that could bring this simple transaction like WiFi network card purchase?Some might ask – is it necessary to buy a WiFi-card instead of a simple AccessPoint (AP)? At first glance you can figure out that there exist the fine models of ADSL-modems with wireless capabilities and that could work as AP. However, it should be noticed that: a) not all home connections to an Internet-provider go through a „copper” like phone- or cable-line; b) you simply need to add a WiFi-capability to an already working gate; c) a WiFi-card itself costs several times cheaper of AP.

Download issue: VPN and BSD

Released: FreeNAS 0.7.2 (Sabanda)

The FreeNAS Team has released FreeNAS 0.7.2 (Sabanda). This is a maintenance release of FreeNAS 0.7 and improves some functions and the translations of the WEBGUI.

Some of the new features are:

  • Samba 3.5.5.
  • AIO settings from the WEBGUI.
  • AMD CPU on-die digital thermal sensor.
  • Advanced format 4kb sector (UFS/GPT data partition)
  • Virtual machine guest support (VMware and Virtialbox)

Announcement | FreeNAS website | Release Notes | Download FreeNAS

FreeBSD news and links (week 40)

I have some  news links an leftovers for you from (the) last (few) week(s):

1. PC-BSD 8.1 [Review]
We always wonder why is it that Microsoft makes us pay to use its OS, so why not shift to Linux or UNIX which are open source and free to use. No doubt Microsoft has made it very easy for lay man to use a PC but we all know Linux is more secure than Windows. Also, off late Linux developers are concentrating on GUI to make Linux easy to use.

FreeBSD – a UNIX like operating system has evolved from AT&T UNIX via Berkely Software Distribution. FreeBSD has a text installer. PC-BSD was founded by FreeBSD professional named Kris Moore in 2005. Kris Moore’s goal was to make FreeBSD easy for everyone to install on desktop. PC-BSD is aimed at users like you and me who are accustomed to Windows but would like a free OS. It has a graphical installation program which uses KDE SC graphical user interface.
Continues (thinkdigit.com)

2. EuroBSDCon Presentation on pc-sysinstal (PDF)
There was a lot of interest about the changes to the pc-sysinstall backend during Kris Moore’s presentation at EuroBSDCon. Continues (Dru’s blog)

There’s an interview with John Hixon from iXsystems on pc-sysinstall (potentially on FreeBSD): bsdtalk199

3. Ten ways Linux and BSD differ

I hear it all the time: people lumping together Linux and any of the BSDs. On occasion, I’ve even done it myself. Of course, there are plenty of similarities. Both are based on Unix and have mostly been developed by non-commercial organisations. They also share a common goal — to create the most useful, reliable operating system available. But there are also significant differences that shouldn’t be ignored, and I thought it would be worth highlighting them here.Continues (zdnet.co.uk)

4. New FreeNAS 0.8 alpha

First and foremost, we have a completely new GUI look and feel. We’ve imported dojango into the GUI to take advantage of Dojo JavaScript Toolkit. The flow of the interface is much nicer, it looks better, and we’ve added additional help to make it easier to use. We think you’ll like this new GUI. We’ve made dozens of improvements over the past few weeks to the GUI. We hope you like the new location for enabling shares. Contiunues (Warner’s blog)

5. Using Clonezilla with FreeNAS or Network Share to Backup a Hard Disk

6. pfSense router setup in VirtualBox

7. Bordeaux Software is looking for testers (and bloggers): Looking for someone to do a review


FreeBSD gets USB 3.0 Support

It seems FreeBSD is receiving support for USB 3.0. From the commit bit:

Commit initial version of new XHCI driver which was written from scratch. This driver adds support for USB3.0 devices. The XHCI interface is also backwards compatible to USB2.0 and USB1.0 and will eventually replace the OHCI/UHCI and EHCI drivers.

There will be follow-up commits during the coming week to link the driver into the default kernel build and add missing USB3.0 functionality in the USB core. Currently only the driver files are committed.

An update

I know, I’ve not been posting a lot and regularly lately. However, this is not because I’ve lost interest in FreeBSD or in running this website ;-).

It’s because I’ve been working on some very interesting things in the background; I’ll be launching something new for this website, and some other FreeBSD related websites soon.

If you’re eager to know what I’ve been working on and willing to give me your valuable feedback and ideas, drop me an email (gvanessen[@at]gmail[.dot]com) and you’ll be the first to find out and to get a peak-preview.

Thanks for your interest and feedback.

Getting started with FreeBSD 8.1

Juliet Kemp from serverwatch.com has tried, used and reviewed FreeBSD 8.1. Though she had some issues with installing the operating system, she agrees that if you want stability and control over your system, FreeBSD is definitely to be considered:

FreeBSD is definitely not as user friendly as modern Linuxes — you’ll need to be a lot more familiar with what’s going on under the hood and perhaps more prepared to have a couple of goes at the installation. The packaging system works well, however, and the number of available packages is comparable with, for example, Debian.

If you want close control over your system and the software you install, FreeBSD is a decent choice. But be aware that if you’re a current Linux user, you’ll have a bit of a learning curve in front of you. This is not to say either style is better or worse, just different, and adjusting to differences takes time. Having said that, I got a working desktop system and a couple of server applications up and running within a few hours, and a lot of that was download time. It’s a powerful and functional member of the UNIX-like family, and reviewing it has certainly interested me enough to keep on experimenting with it. If she’d installed FreeBSD with the PC-BSD installer (pc-sysinstall) things would have been easier ;-)

Full review here: Getting Started with FreeBSD 8.1