FreeBSD Device Drivers: a guide for the intrepid (book)

“Device drivers make it possible for your software to communicate with your hardware, and because every operating system has specific requirements, driver writing is nontrivial.

When developing for FreeBSD, you’ve probably had to scour the Internet and dig through the kernel sources to figure out how to write the drivers you need. Thankfully, that stops now.

In FreeBSD Device Drivers, Joseph Kong will teach you how to master everything from the basics of building and running loadable kernel modules to more complicated topics like thread synchronization. After a crash course in the different FreeBSD driver frameworks, extensive tutorial sections dissect real-world drivers like the parallel port printer driver.”

The book has been reviewed by beginlinux

Buy this book on Amazon or nostarch press  (use DRIVERS for 40% discount)

Configure advanced features with pfSense 2.0 (Packt Pub’s new book)

Packt Publishing, the publishers of Learning FreeNAS, are now in the process of publishing pfSense 2 Cookbook.

This book helps users discover the power of pfSense‘s core functionality. It is written by Matt Williamson and is filled with examples of interfaces, firewall rules, NAT port-forwarding, VPN services, etc.

pfSense 2 Cookbook helps readers determine their deployment scenario, their hardware, throughput, andinterface requirements, and to select the right platform version of pfSense. They will be able to configure essential networking services such as DHCP, DNS, Dynamic DNS, and will be able to provide external Remote Desktop Access to an internal machine.

Through this book readers will learn to create multiple WAN interfaces, virtual IPs, a virtual LAN, gateways, and bridged interfaces. They will be able to configure traffic-shaping and Quality of Service (QoS), firewall redundancy with a CARP firewall failover, and external logging with syslog.

Talking about CARP, I came across a very interesting site explaining how to set up a CARO cluster, step-by-step: http://pfsense.basis06.com/download/tutorials/carp/carp-cluster-new.htm. There’s enough material available and howtos explaining how to set this up, but this little demo, is super clear.

When I have read the book, I’ll let you know more about the contents.

More information can be found here: pfSense 2 Cookbook, and a free chapter, dealing with DHCP and DNS, can be downloaded here: pfSense 2 Cookbook – sample chapter.

The Definitive Guide to PC-BSD (Book)

PC-BSD 8.0 is almost here, and so is The Definitive Guide to PC-BSD. This book is written by Dru Lavigne and due to be published later this month, 28 February.

Since its initial release in early 2006, the PC-BSD operating system has quickly become a popular desktop for both novice and experienced computer users. Novice users are initially amazed that such an attractive looking operating system is available for free. They quickly learn that it is also easy to use, free from viruses and spyware, provides the applications they need to perform their computing tasks, and has a large selection of additional software to choose from. Advanced users appreciate that it is built on top of FreeBSD, an operating system known for its security and stability, yet it still allows them to explore and tweak the system to meet their needs.

Pre-order on amazon: The Definitive Guide to PC-BSD

Book: Network Administration with FreeBSD

Network Administration with FreeBSDA new book has been added to the “FreeBSD library”: “Network Administration with FreeBSD” by Babak Farrokhi.

This 280 page book is about the building, securing, and maintaining of networks with the FreeBSD operating system, and deals with the following topics

  1. Set up and manage networking on FreeBSD
  2. Virtualization with FreeBSD Jails, IPFW and PF
  3. Configure interfaces, protocols, and routing

Network Administrators looking for skills beyond installation and configuration of FreeBSD may find this book useful.

The following description has been taken from the Amazon page:

This book is a guide to FreeBSD for network administrators; therefore it does not cover basic installation and configuration of FreeBSD, but is about using FreeBSD to build, secure, and maintain networks. After introducing the basic tools for monitoring the performance and security of the system the book moves on to cover using jails-FreeBSD virtual environments-to secure your network.

Then it shows how to overcome the different bottlenecks that you may meet depending on the services you are running by tweaking different parameters to maintain a high performance from your FreeBSD server.

Next it covers using the ifconfig utility to configure interfaces with different layer protocols and about connectivity testing and debugging tools.

After covering using User PPP or Kernel PPP for Point-to-Point Protocol network configuration it explains basic IP forwarding in FreeBSD and the use of the built-in routing daemons, routed and route6d, which support RIPv1, RIPv2, RIPng, and RDISC.

Next it covers the OpenOSPFD and OpenBGPD daemons that you can install to run OSPF and BGP on your host.Then it covers setup and configuration of IPFW and PF, and finally looks at some important internet services and how to set them up on your FreeBSD server

A short review by Murray Stokely can be found here.

For more information and the best deals, visit:

Amazon.com | Amazon.co.uk | Amazon.ca | Amazon.de | Amazon.fr

Building a server with FreeBSD 7

Building a Server with FreeBSD 7No Starch Press has released its eagerly awaited Building a Server with FreeBSD 7

This modular guide to building a FreeBSD server is has been written to make it easy for (new) users to choose the packages that they need, with step-by-step directions for installation and configuration.

The book’s modules cover topics like:

  • Running common FreeBSD admin commands and tasks.
  • Managing the FreeBSD ports collection.
  • Installing third-party apps like Apache, Courier-IMAP, SpamAssassin, CUPS, Cyrus SASL, MediaWiki, and WordPress.
  • Setting up MySQL, NTP, ISC DHCP, ISC BIND DNS, PHP, OpenLDAP, OpenSSH, OpenSSL, and OpenVPN.
  • Appendixes explain user management, backup/restore, and network protocols. Building a Server with FreeBSD 7 will have readers running their own server loaded with useful modules in no time, with a minimum of hassle.

The most difficult part of building a server with FreeBSD, the Unix-like operating system, is arguably software installation and configuration. Finding the software is easy enough; getting everything up and running is another thing entirely. The only option for many people has been to hire a consultant.Building a Server with FreeBSD 7 is for those of us who prefer to build our own server. If you’re a small business owner looking for a reliable email server, a curious Windows administrator, or if you just want to put that old computer in the closet to work, you’ll learn how to get things up and running quickly. Then, once you have a working system, you can experiment, extend, and customize as you please.

You’ll learn how to install FreeBSD, then how to install popular server applications with the ports collection. Each package is treated as an independent module, so you can dip into the book at any point to install just the packages you need, when you need them.

Check amazon for the cheapest copies