Mount ReiserFS partitions in FreeBSD (howto)

My desktop dual boots Gentoo Linux and FreeBSD. When I installed Gentoo at the time I decided on splitting certain directories in distinct partition, so the I created a partition strictly for portage and opted for the ReiserFS filesystem.

Today I wanted to cut down on the bandwith and decided to copy over a needed distfile from the ReiserFS partition to FreeBSD.

Bellow you’ll find the procedure to mount a ReiserFS in read-only mode. Do notice than the entire procedure is performed only on the FreeBSD system:

% man reiserfs
% su
# kldload reiserfs.ko
# mount -t reiserfs -o ro /dev/ad4s5 /mnt

Full post and explanation here

Source: linux-bsd-sharing.blogspot.com (29/01/2008)

Freebsd mount a NAS via SMB / CIFS (howto)

Qestion: I want to use our NAS server to store backups. Our NAS supports FTP and CIFS / SMB sharing technology. How do I mount and store files on NAS using FreeBSD? How do I automate entire procedure using a shell script? Is that doable? If so, what’s the easiest solution ftp or CIFS?

Answer. The mount_smbfs command mounts a share from a remote server using SMB/CIFS protocol. You can easily mount NAS share using the following syntax:

Source: cyberciti.biz (25/01/2008)

Using ccache on FreeBSD (howto)

ccache is a compiler cache. It speeds up re-compilation of C/C++ code by caching previous compiles and detecting when the same compile is being done again.

The following is a step by step guide to how to enable and use ccache on FreeBSD 7.1:

  1. su
  2. # cd /usr/ports/devel/ccache
  3. # make install clean
  4. # vim /etc/make.conf

.if (!empty(.CURDIR:M/usr/src*) || !empty(.CURDIR:M/usr/obj*)) && !defined(NOCCACHE)

CC=/usr/local/libexec/ccache/world-cc

CXX=/usr/local/libexec/ccache/world-c++

.endif

Basically we’ve started by installing ccache (steps 1 through 3) and proceeded by editing /etc/make.conf as to enable ccache on builds.

Now we need to update the environment.

Further instructions here

Source: linux-bsd-sharing.blogspot.com (19/01/2009)

DesktopBSD Live USB stick

Fusselbaer has posted some instructions on how to set up DesktopBSD running live from a USB memory stick.

The instructions are in German and can’t unfortunately be automatically translated with Google Translate since the link is https. The steps and commands are easy to follow, but if you’re not altogether sure, copy the (part of the) text and paste it in Google Translate.

I’ve not tried it but I assume this can easily be adapted to make PC-BSD and FreeBSD live USB sticks.

Setting up a FreeBSD ZFS-only system

“After loader support for ZFS was imported into FreeBSD around a month ago, I’ve been thinking of installing a ZFS-only system on my laptop. I also decided to try out using the GPT layout instead of using disklabels etc.

The first thing I started with was to grab a snapshot of FreeBSD CURRENT. Since sysinstall doesn’t support setting up ZFS etc, it can’t be used, so one have to use the Fixit environment on the FreeBSD install cd to set it up. I started out by removing the existing partition table on the disk (just writing zeros to the start of the disk will do). If you’re reading this before the january 2009 snapshot of CURRENT comes out , you have to create your own iso image in order to get loader with the latest fixes. Look in src/release/Makefile and src/release/i386/mkisoimages.sh for how to do this.

Then, the next step was to setup the GPT with the partitions that I wanted to have. Using gpt in FreeBSD, one should create one partition to contain the initial gptzfsboot loader. In addition, I wanted a swap partition, as well as a partition to use for a zpool for the whole system.

To setup the GPT, I used gpart(8) and looked at examples from the man-page. The first thing to do is to setup the GPT partition scheme, first by creating the partition table, and then add the appropriate partitions”

Step-by-step instructions can be found here (Lost in volumes – 16/12/2008)

OpenVPN – getting it running

FreeBSD Diary has 2 howtos on setting up OpenVPN on FreeBSD

This article is about OpenVPN, a full-featured open source SSL VPN solution. I first started using OpenVPN in December 2006. That is nearly two years ago. I took some notes but I never published anything until today. My original use for OpenVPN was easy access to my home network while away from home. For this is was wonderful. Being able to ssh “directly” to my machines, cvsup, etc, was very convenient.

1) 1 OpenVPN – getting it running

In this article, I will show you how I created a routed VPN using OpenVPN. In this network, multiple clients can attach to the server, each of which has access to the network attached to the server. Each client can also contact any other client, subject to firewall rules.

In my case, I wanted a way for all my servers (on the internet, in data centers) to contact my CVS repository behind my firewall at home. Given that home has a dynamic IP address, it complicates matters. A VPN solves this issue and provides several benefits.

2) Creating a Routed VPN