pfSense on FLOSS (audio interview)

pfsense logo 100x100Scott Ullrich and Chris Buechler, the guys behind the pfSense project, have been interviewed by Randal Schwartz and Leo Laporte on FLOSS 101. (via)

FLOSS Weekly is a podcast covering free and open source software.

Will Backman has interviewed Randal Schwartz on BSDTalk (24 mins). They talk about Randal’s early experiences with BSD, permissive licenses, OpenBSD, OpenSolaris, perl, the BSDFund credit card, and the Floss Weekly podcast.

ostatic.com interview with FreeNAS developers

ostatic.com recently interviewed Olivier Cochard-Labbe, FreeNAS founder, and Volker Theile, project administrator. FreeNAS is free, lightweight, open source network attached storage (NAS) server software, based on FreeBSD.

The following questions were asked:

  • Who is your typical user? How do you support your users?
  • How did you get involved in FreeNAS?
  • How have you monetized your project thus far?
  • How do you benefit from the particular license you’ve chosen?
  • What does the open source movement need?

Full interview here.

Interview with Kris Moore, PC-BSD (Distrowatch)

PC-BSD LogoDistrwatch interviewed Kris Moore, founder and lead developer of PC-BSD, a user-friendly desktop operating system based on FreeBSD.

They talk about the history of and reasons for creating PC-BSD, PBI package management, the upcoming PC-BSD 7, KDE4.1:

The so-called “distribution for the average Joe” market has been expanding at a rapid pace in recent years. While the vast majority of these projects is invariably based on Linux, we have also witnessed a few attempts to create a user-friendly “distribution” based on operating systems that traditionally belonged to the hacker’s domain, notably FreeBSD and OpenSolaris. One of them is PC-BSD, a project launched in 2005. Its main goal? To hide the complexity of FreeBSD and to deliver an alternative to Linux on the desktop. Its main claim to fame? The web-based software installation infrastructure called PBI. Its community? Over 8,000 registered forum members and a growing network of world-wide community sites. All this thanks to the original vision and undying conviction of Kris Moore, the founder and lead developer of PC-BSD.

Kris was kind enough to answer a few questions about his beginnings with FreeBSD and the forthcoming release of PC-BSD 7.0.

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What’s new in FreeBSD 7?

FreeBSD LogoFreeBSD is back to its incredible performance and now can take advantage of multi-core/CPUs systems very well… So well that some benchmarks on both Intel and AMD systems showed release 7.0 being faster than Linux 2.6 when running PostreSQL or MySQL.

Federico Biancuzzi interviewed two dozen developers to discuss all the cool details of FreeBSD 7.0: networking and SMP performance, SCTP support, the new IPSEC stack, virtualization, monitoring frameworks, ports, storage limits and a new journaling facility, what changed in the accounting file format, jemalloc(), ULE, and more.

m0n0wall, an open source lightweight firewall

M0n0wall logo Jeff Goldman has done an interview with Manual Kasper, the creator of m0n0wall. Here it is: Manuel Kasper developed the embedded firewall software package m0n0wall back in 2002, he says, while experimenting with embedded x86-based computers.

Having just succeeded at stripping down FreeBSD enough to make it run on a Soekris net4501 board… and deploying it for use as a home firewall/NAT router, I wanted to go one step further, I wanted a nice, web-based interface to configure it, just like the commercial firewall boxes.

Kasper says he chose the name m0n0wall simply because “Mono” was his nickname in school.

I’m not sure why I replaced the o’s for zeros—perhaps because all domain names with normal o’s were already taken—and when I look at it now, it seems a bit silly/’31337′—but it has become a trademark anyway,

he says. And what started as a home project to make it easier to configure FreeBSD on the Soekris net4501 has grown rapidly.

At some point, I decided that it had become good enough that other people might want to have a look at it, so I posted a note about the first version on a mailing list,” Kasper says. “The interest in the project turned out to be big, so I created a dedicated web page and started releasing new versions with new features every few weeks.

Looking at the solution as a whole, Kasper says the best way to explain m0n0wall’s strengths is to look at the stability and reliability of FreeBSD.

m0n0wall, owing to the fact that it’s based on FreeBSD, inherits those qualities

Read the whole interview on isp-planet.com

Note: Manuel Kasper’s embedded FreeBSD-based firewall software package is especially attractive to WISPs and small ISPs.