Migrate From MySQL to MariaDB In FreeBSD

unixmen has put together a howto showing how to migrate your databases from MySQL to MariaDB.

As most of you will be aware, since Oracle took over MySQL and took control of the project, a lot changed. Oracle doesn’t like open source and hence MySQL is dying a slow death. MySQL’s founder, Michael Widenius (+Michael Widenius), left the project and set up the competing MariaDB (+mariadb) database project.

If you’re not sure where MySQL is heading and want some security had use some new, cool features, have a look at and/or migrate to MariaDB.

MariaDB is a community-developed fork of the MySQL relational database management system, the impetus being the community maintenance of its free status under the GNU GPL. As a fork of a leading open source software system, it is notable for being led by its original developers and triggered by concerns over direction by an acquiring commercial company Oracle.

Migrate From MySQL To MariaDB In FreeBSD (unixmen)

Minimal FreeBSD desktop, with OpenBox (howto)

FreeBSD Forums user Taz has put together a very detailed howto showing you exactly how to setup a minimal FreeBSD installation with the OpenBox window manager.

If this is something you’ve been wanting to do for awhile but didn’t know where to start or what to tweak etc, have a look. You can’t go wrong.

After deciding that FreeBSD was going to be my new primary OS the question was “how to set it up for desktop usage?”. FreeBSD handbook helped me with this a lot in the beginning. But if you follow the handbook you will probably end up with GNOME or KDE desktop environment and this “how to” is about minimal but functional desktop on FreeBSD.

Fact is that FreeBSD is more than capable of being a desktop OS the only question is what are your own preferences/requests. Mine were: minimalism, functionality, speed, low memory footprint and avoiding linuxisms.

[howto] minimal FreeBSD desktop

FreeBSD Email Server howto’s

Over the last week or so I have come across two posts showing how to set up a FreeBSD based email server. If this is something you have been wanting to do, have a look at the following two links.

1. FreeBSD 9 Mail server setup: Postfix, Dovecot 2, Virtual Users, MySQL, SASL, Postfixadmin and others (ghid-it)

For long time I used FreeBSD to serve email to corporate customers or other tasks. Now I will show how I did package installation and configuration for an email server with virtual email users, using the following components

Link to howto.

2. Installing Qmail on FreeBSD 9.x

Bill from freebsdrocks.net has 21 howtos for setting up QMail on FreeBSD, with anti-spam support, virus checking etc.

Installing Qmail on FreeBSD 9.x

Howto: Keeping FreeBSD up-to-date

Vermaden has posted two very useful step-by-step tutorials on the FreeBSD Forums showing how you can keep your base system and applications up-to-date (the vermaden way):

As always, the FreeBSD Handbook also has an excellent chapter on this topic: Updating FreeBSD.

RootBSD has posted a howto showing how you can update FreeBSD with Webmin if you run a VPS or dedicated server:

Since I began using FreeBSD 4.x, I quickly learned of Webmin, a web-based server administration tool, which allows administrators to manage everything from: Mysql, Apache, Sendmail, system processes, networking and much more. One of the coolest features of Webmin is it’s modular structure. Modules can easily be downloaded and installed to fit your specific server needs. In this quick tutorial you will learn how to install and use Webmin.

With RootBSD you get ease of mind and full control with all of the advantages from a dedicated server: full root access, customizable environment, and guaranteed hardware resources.

Finds of the day: Daemon oggcast and howtobsd.com

Whilst serving and checking out a few links today, I came across the following sites that you may be interested in too:

Daemon & Penguin oggcast.

The latest podcast is about GhostBSD 2.0 which was released last week (Released: GhostBSD 2.0):

In episode number 17, I go over a recent install of GhostBSD 2.0 which now has a home on my laptop. It happens to be one of the easiest installs so far. You end up with a fully configured FreeBSD running Gnome as the desktop. The GhostBSD team are doing a great job, so give it a try and you will be up and running in no time (Listen)

II howtobsd.comSimple way to understanding FreeBSD

This site has been around since October 2009 but I only stumbled upon it today. As the name suggests, you can find there many useful commands and howtos, e.g:

  • Create a SVN repository
  • Monitoring FreeBSD servers with Munin
  • Installing Ruby on Rails on FreeBSD
  • freebsd geom mirror howto
  • How to move FreeBSD system from one hdd to another
  • Backup freebsd howto with fsbackup

Build your own FreeBSD update server (howto)

This article describes building an internal FreeBSD Update Server.

Experienced users or administrators are often responsible for several machines or environments. They understand the difficult demands and challenges of maintaining such an infrastructure.

Running a FreeBSD Update Server makes it easier to deploy security and software patches to selected test machines before rolling them out to production. It also means a number of systems can be updated from the local network rather than a much slower Internet connection.

This article outlines the steps involved in creating an internal FreeBSD Update Server.

Full article (via, originally published on experts exchange)

FreeBSD quick news and links (21/07/2010)

I Super-accurate computer clock created
A free pies of software that allows computers to keep phenomenally accurate time has been developed by researchers in Melbourne. The software, called RADclock, should improve everything from Skype conversations to the tracking of subway trains.

For computers to communicate effectively keeping accurate time is vital. Every application or service that relies on computers collaborating implies that the computers are synchronised,” Julien says.

The problem is, while the clocks built into most computers keep time well, they’re not 100 per cent accurate. These clocks monitor how many times per second a quartz crystal inside the computer vibrates. But this ‘crystal frequency’ is a little different for every crystal, and changes all the time, due to variations in temperature, for example. “And that can make a big difference when errors accumulate,” he says.

At the moment, RADclock works only with open source software, such as Linux and FreeBSD, but a Windows version may be available in the future.

Read more:  Super-accurate computer clock created

II SIFTR Committed
On July 3, Lawrence Stewart committed SIFTR (Statistical Information For TCP Research) to HEAD. SIFTR was part of the Improvements to the FreeBSD TCP Stack project that the Foundation funded last year. SIFTR is a kernel module that logs a range of statistics on active TCP connections to a log file. It provides the ability to make highly granular measurements of TCP connection state, aimed at system administrators, developers and researchers. (source: FreeBSD Foundation)

III New jail utility “qjail” published for public usage
This is a news announcement to inform people who have interest in jails, that a new jail utility is available.

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qjail/

Has a file suitable for the pkg_add command or the port make files can be downloaded and a “make install” run.

Qjail [ q = quick ] is a 4th generation wrapper for the basic chroot jail system that includes security and performance enhancements. Plus a new level of “user friendliness” enhancements dealing with deploying just a few jails or large jail environments consisting of 100′s of jails. Qjail requires no knowledge of the jail command usage.

Source and more info: New jail utility “qjail” published for public usage

IV HOW-TO: Install Apache Tomcat 6 on FreeBSD 8.0
Calebscreek writes: On a recent whim, I decided to spend a Saturday morning attempting to install Apache Tomcat 6 on FreeBSD 8.0. It turned out that it’s not as straightforward as some GNU/Linux distros*; particularly those that are Debian-based. Through some trial and error, though, I got things working as I liked.
Step-by-step guide: Install Apache Tomcat 6 on FreeBSD 8.0

V New FreeBSD Committers

  • Joseph S. Atkinson (ports)
  • Tijl Coosemans (src)

VI iXsystems Introduces New iX-TB4X2: Triton TwinBlade Blade Servers
iXsystems, the company sponsoring PC-BSD‘s development, has introduced the iX-TB4X2.
The new Triton TwinBlade Server from iXsystems is the ideal solution for system administrators who need energy efficiency, density, and ease of management in Linux and FreeBSD environments. The iX-TB4X2 delivers the most energy-efficient blade server in the industry with four N+1 redundant, high-efficiency (94%) 2500W power supplies.

“Unlike other server companies, iXsystems’ focus is on open source hardware design. That’s why we know that finding the right hardware that is compatible with a software solution is of critical importance to open source system administrators. Our customers can have full confidence that the new iX-TB4X2 is fully pre-tested for compatibility with their desired OS and won’t encounter problems post-deployment.”

says Andrew Madrid, product marketing manager, iXsystems, Inc

Full Press Release: iXsystems Introduces New iX-TB4X2: Triton TwinBlade Blade Servers

VII GhostBSD 1.5 beta amd64 is out
Source

VIII DuckDuckGo: A New Search Engine Built from Open Source
DuckDuckGo is a new search engine focused on relevant results and respecting user privacy. Actually a mash-up of several other sites like Wikipedia, About, Bing, and Yahoo, DuckDuckGo also uses it’s own web crawler: the DuckDuckBot. DuckDuckGo uses what it calls Zero-click search results to try to guess what you are looking for and give it to you directly in your search results. I’ve been using DuckDuckGo for a few weeks now, and I’m impressed. What further impresses me is that the entire site is built on open source tools, ranging from FreeBSD for the operating system to good old-fashioned Perl for the logic.

HOWTO: Create a FreeBSD 8 i386 Xen PV domU

Aprogas has put together a very useful howto showing how you can create a FreeBSD Xen PV domU.

Xen is virtualization software, which lets you run multiple operating systems on the same physical machine. The goal of this guide is to show you how to create a FreeBSD 8 installation that will run as a guest OS, without the need for a processor that supports hardware-assisted virtualization. It would go beyond the scope of this guide to explain how exactly Xen works or what the differences between PV and HVM are, suffice to say dom0 is the host OS and domU the guest OS. Although FreeBSD fully supports being a Xen domU, it is not yet very well documented and not suited for novice Xen users. Especially the lack of a Xen-aware installer or pre-built Xen-aware images make things more difficult. If you are a Xen novice, I recommend starting first with pre-built Linux images, and then trying a NetBSD domU installation, before proceeding with FreeBSD.”

Continues (FreeBSD forums)